Archives for category: Technology

I certainly wouldn’t be the first to talk about cell phone etiquette issues, but there is a point where people cruise right past bad etiquette to complete ridiculousness and I can’t help but take notice. It’s probably defined right around that moment when you’re in the public bathroom listening to the person in the stall next to you talk to her best friend about last night’s debaucheries.

It’s one thing to utilize the necessary toilet time in the privacy of your own home in order to check email, browse the Web or play a round of electronic Yahtzee! – in fact not a bad idea at all – but a public restroom? Seriously?

If there is ever a right time to log out, it has got to be while relieving oneself  in public. And who really wants to be identified with the smell next door anyway?

I do understand the value of these little gadgets that keep us wired all the time and logged into the latest news, posts, emails, and whatever else determines us to be as up-to-date as possible, but there has got to be an instant where some people stop themselves from saying “Gee, I have to go to the bathroom, maybe NOW I’ll call up my mother while in the public restroom and talk about her cancer.”

The point: take a moment to rethink when, where and how that gadget of a cellphone demands time in your life and the time of strangers around you.

Do I need to even mention the risk of OOPS! that toilet just had your phone for lunch?!?

The people at cellphones.org seem to have nailed down the basics with their Cell Phone Etiquette chart.

Logging out now.

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In a recent issue of the International Herald Tribune Magazine, a selection of some very smart people were recruited to have their say about “Too Much Information?”

A few spoke directly to what this blog is all about – embrace technology with some caution, use it with your brains and don’t overdo it. Good to know we’re in admirable company when we decide to question the overuse of computers and gadgets in our lives.

At the same time, French philosopher Bernard-Henri Levy called technology his “ally” and the founder of Virgin Group, Richard Branson called it “liberating.”  The editor of Le Monde, Sylvie Kauffmann described it as more of a menace.

The English-Indian-American novelist, Pico Iyer asked why is it that all our tools of connection leave us feeling so frazzled, disconnected and alone?

The image comes to mind of millions of lonely people spending more time hooked up with a computer and cell phone than anything else.

Iyer writes further: “It’s only by stepping away from our machines, after all, that we can begin to see how best to make use of them. Technology has given use the world; it’s up to us to now see what we can and will bring to technology.”

By stepping away and detaching from our pods of technology we are just human again and free to think and wonder on our own.

So the smart people had their say and though not uniform in their feelings of course, the message to me was clear… thinking about technology and our role with it is an exercise that keeps us the independent thinking reasoning human beings that we are. Questioning how we use it and when we use it is far better than mindless texting, surfing and typing without ever a second thought.

In other words… step back to think about you and your relationship with your gadgets every once in awhile and of course, take the time to log off.

Logging off now.